Tuesday, January 1, 2008

Les Miserables Keyboard Research

Hello and welcome to my blog.
The goal of this project is to document my findings as an MD and share them with other MDs who might be performing these shows.
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So, I have a chance at working on a production of Les Miserables this summer.
Being the keyboard synthesis dork that I am, I decided to do some research on what I might be in for as a keyboardist for this megamusical.
(Note: The following information will also be of help to MD's of the Les Miserables School Edition)

Let's start with the basics:

Les Miserables was developed as a concept show in 1980. By 1985, it was reworked and opened in the West End in London. The show by this point was very similar to what was then brought over to the US, where Les Mis opened on Broadway in 1987.

Being the mid-80s and technology being what it was, the Yamaha DX7 synthesizer was very popular. The DX7 had 61 touch sensitive (but not weighted) keys, and could only store 32 patches at a time. Patches could be loaded or saved onto cartridges, or loaded in from a computer over MIDI using Sysex.

John Cameron was the orchestrator of Les Mis, starting with the French Concept version in 1980. A fantastic orchestrator and synth programmer, Cameron developed all of the DX7 patches used in the show. The patches are dark and synthy, and not really in any way trying to sound like acoustic instruments. They are there to add to the full effect of the show.

Over the years, the show moved to DX7-II and then the SY77.
Later, new patches were created for Roland JV1080 modules programmed by "Stuart". These sounds were more acoustic (per Schonberg's request) and were used on the 10th Anniversary CD/DVDs. In 1997, Stuart created 'hybrid' patches for Kurzweil K2vX synths, that mixed acoustic sounds with the "more grungy, dirty sounds." In 1998, a decision was made to go back to the DX patches, because they were more authentic to the feel of the show. Stuart sampled or recreated the sounds on the Kurzweil K2000, and this is the set that was used in London from then on.

This is all important to know, because you will have many different options presented to you when music directing or playing the show.

The original productions use two keyboard parts -- Keyboard 1 and 2.
When renting the show from MTI, at least, you will likely also be provided with a Keyboard 3 part. This part was written to be used in lieu of a string section (or perhaps to augment a very small string section) and should be played using more modern string patches, like on a Kurzweil. If you have a good string section, it is advised to not use this part!

Because of the original DX7's limitations of 61 keys and 32 patches, each player would have two keyboards, stacked like manuals on an organ. They are referred to Upper Keyboard and Lower Keyboard.

So now, you the music director, are MDing a production of either the full show, or the school edition, and you're wondering what to do. Back in 2004, I was working on the school edition, and I got my hands on a Yamaha TX7 (a rack version of the DX7) and I was able to obtain the original patches online, but I wasn't able to make any sense out of them. The patches as listed in the Keyboard books did not correspond to the patches I had downloaded, and I didn't understand why there were 4 banks of patches. It makes more sense now that I know that each player had two keyboards, each with its own bank.

If you can get your hands on any of the original style keyboards, great! Another option would be to use a software emulator like Native Instruments FM7 or FM8 (the new version of FM7).

Now, at present, I only have access to a full score that does not have any of the patch names or DX patch numbers provided, so I can't tell if you would really need two keyboards using a DX7-II or later. I am waiting on a patch list that will go with my score to determine this.
If you have any of the keyboard parts books to the show presently, contact me, and maybe with your help we can figure this out.

Where can you find these patches, you may wonder?
I found them years ago on a DX7 Yahoo group, but for your ease, you can get them here: http://www.mediafire.com/?btvmtolyv0o
I generally use the DX71 banks. I think the DX72 banks were for DX7-II or later synths. I'm not sure what the MIDI in the ZIP is for--no doubt another method of transmitting the sysex banks.
To be specific, the K1UP banks are for Upper Keyboard 1, and the K1LO is for Lower Keyboard 1, and K2UP is for Upper Keyboard 2 and K2LO is for Lower Keyboard 2.
The banks need to be loaded to the keyboard using Sysex software and a MIDI interface. I may write an entry on how to do that at another time.

Now we need to decipher the patches. Here is a patch list that will show how the patches in the part books correspond to the DX patches:

Patches in Italics are from original Yamaha banks.

Upper Keyboard 1

  1. Vibes
  2. Horn 8vb
  3. Bishop's Organ (Marked "Clarinet")
  4. Gentle Woodwinds (Marked "Clarinet")
  5. Harsh Strings 8vb
  6. Gentle Organ/Strings
  7. Long Strings
  8. Mellow Sustain (Marked "Strings")
  9. Hard Piano (Almost "Jangle")
  10. Low Resonant Electric Piano 8vb (Marked "Acc Piano")
  11. Piano/Xylo (Marked "Piano)
  12. Low Resonant Electric Piano Loco (Marked "Acc Piano")
  13. "Sparkle" Electric Piano
  14. Slow Low Growl (Marked "Strings")
  15. Touch Sensitive Strings 8vb
  16. Heavy Electric Piano 8vb
  17. Recorder
  18. Flute
  19. Thick Phased Electric Piano 8vb
  20. Clavinet/'Hard'
  21. Mellow Brass
  22. Gentle Electric Piano (Guitar-Like)
  23. Guitar Short Attack (+ Sustain Harmonices 8va)
  24. Block (Mallet Sound)
  25. Mellow Harp (Use 1/5 Mod Wheel)
  26. Harp
  27. Muted Bells
  28. Sharp Brass
  29. Electric Piano/Gentle 'edge'
  30. Low Quasi Brass 8vb
  31. Voice
  32. Low Resonant Brass 8vb

Lower Keyboard 1

  1. String Sound (1A5)
  2. Thunder
  3. Low Brass 8vb
  4. Slow Strings (2A8)
  5. Close-Up Strings
  6. Low Slow Strings 8vb
  7. "Orchestra" (1A7)
  8. Fairly Slow Strings
  9. Harsh 'Wah' Strings
  10. Harpsichord (Single Manual)
  11. Fender Piano (1A11)
  12. Sharp Piano
  13. Sitar (1B22)
  14. Glockenspiel (2A22)
  15. Deep Dense Piano 8vb
  16. Reedy Sustain (Marked "Strings")
  17. Hard Edge guitar
  18. Clavinet 8vb
  19. Acoustic Guitar/Plectrum
  20. 'Clang' Guitar
  21. "Leadharp" (Harp/Guitar)
  22. Warm piano
  23. Finger Style Guitar (Use 1/5 Mod Wheel)
  24. Xylo 8va (2A24)
  25. Fairly Sharp Brass
  26. Tubular Bells (1A26)
  27. Low Sustain 8vb (Marked "Strings")
  28. Harp (Use 1/6 Mod Wheel) (1B30)
  29. Sharper Harp (Use 1/6 Mod Wheel) (1B29)
  30. 'Clang' Bass 16vb
  31. Thick Brass 8vb (2A12)
  32. Organ/Strings 8vb

Upper Keyboard 2

  1. Vibes
  2. Horn 8vb
  3. Bishop's Organ (Marked "Clarinet")
  4. Gentle Woodwinds (Marked "Clarinet")
  5. Harsh Strings 8vb
  6. Gentle Organ/Strings
  7. Long Strings
  8. Mellow Sustain (Marked "Strings")
  9. Harsh Strings Loco
  10. Low Resonant Electric Piano 8vb (Marked "Acc Piano")
  11. Piano/Xylo (Marked "Piano)
  12. Low Resonant Electric Piano Loco (Marked "Acc Piano")
  13. Syn-Orchestra (Organ-Like)
  14. Slow Low Growl (Marked "Strings")
  15. Touch Sensitive Strings 8vb
  16. Electric Piano 'Roar' 8vb
  17. Recorder
  18. Flute
  19. Thick Phased Electric Piano 8vb
  20. Clavinet/'Hard'
  21. Mellow Brass
  22. Gentle Electric Piano (Guitar-Like)
  23. Ringing Guitar
  24. Block (Mallet Sound)
  25. Mellow Harp (Use 1/5 Mod Wheel)
  26. High Bells 8va
  27. Lower Bells
  28. Sharp Brass
  29. "Pluk" (Hit Hard & Release)
  30. Low Quasi Brass 8vb
  31. Voice
  32. Low Resonant Brass 8vb

Lower Keyboard 2

  1. String Sound (1A5)
  2. Breathy Brass 8vb (1A3)
  3. Low Brass 8vb
  4. Slow Strings (2A8)
  5. Close-Up Strings
  6. Low Slow Strings 8vb
  7. "Orchestra" (1A7)
  8. Fairly Slow Strings
  9. Harsh 'Wah' Strings
  10. Harpsichord (Single Manual)
  11. Fender Piano (1A11)
  12. Sharp Piano
  13. Sitar (1B22)
  14. Glockenspiel (2A22)
  15. Deep Dense Piano 8vb
  16. Reedy Sustain (Marked "Strings")
  17. Hard Edge guitar
  18. Clavinet 8vb
  19. Acoustic Guitar/Plectrum
  20. 'Clang' Guitar
  21. Medium Attack Strings
  22. Warm piano
  23. Finger Style Guitar (Use 1/5 Mod Wheel)
  24. Xylo 8va (2A24)
  25. Fairly Sharp Brass
  26. Tubular Bells (1A26)
  27. Low Sustain 8vb (Marked "Strings")
  28. Harp (Use 1/6 Mod Wheel) (1B30)
  29. Sharper Harp (Use 1/6 Mod Wheel) (1B29)
  30. 'Clang' Bass 16vb
  31. Thick Brass 8vb (2A12)
  32. DX-Intro (Long Growing Evil 'Growl')
I am still researching more on the latest Kurzweil patches for the show. I do not know if it is possible to obtain these. I know that in the past, any theatre company performing the (full) show was given the DX patches on an Atari formatted floppy disk to transfer. I had contacted MTI in 2004 because I thought I had the wrong patches, since I did not have this list at that time. I asked them if they could send the DX7 patches. The response given to me was that the patches probably weren't around any more, after all, the DX7 has not been in heavy use since the late 80's /early 90's. Clearly they were wrong, and never knew about the Kurzweil patches.

The great thing about the new Kurzweil patches, if we music directors are allowed access to them, is that they will probably be usable in any K2-series keyboard, as they are all backwards compatible.

Hopefully this is somewhat useful. If you have any questions or comments, or anything else you'd like me to explore, please leave a comment and let me know!

-Alex

Major Source: http://www.mixermania.co.uk/ - Martin Hughes
(Website no longer available. Found through Google and Archive.org web archive.)

44 comments:

Johannes said...

Very good reading! You've clearly been doing some research on this topic. If you ever obtain either the Kurzweil patches or the sample patches, will you let me know how to gain them?
my email: rallmons@hotmail.com


How about doing a case on Pink Floyd's use of Kurzweil machines to emulate their analog synths on the 1994/95 P*U*L*S*E World tour?

Keep up!

JWF

Chris said...

I can give you the contact information for the K2000 program set, if you have not already gotten it. I don't see your email address on here though, and I don't want to post my publicly!

Alex Tirrell said...

Nope, never did get the K2000 program stuff yet. If you see this, send it my way! atirrell@eptheatre.org

Alex Tirrell said...

Johannes-- I only found out very recently that they did this.

I am a fan of Pink Floyd and Kurzweil, so that would make a great topic for someday.

I'm not certain, but I think they might have been using them even on the Momentary Lapse of Reason tour as well... Some of the tracks I heard from that sounded similar.

Hew said...
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emailwhatsit said...

This is great!

I loaded the patches into FM8 and they sound fantastic, though only about two thirds of what's in your list show up, something to do with it not being an actual DX7 I guess.

You were spot on about the midi file, by the way. I just opened that and it loaded all the files in, rather than me having to do all 8 files separately.

re.Mark said...

Does anyone have a zip of these files available they could upload/email me? The MediaFire link is dead, I have tried emailing the OP but had no reply.
Really interested in hearing these sounds in FM8!.
Cheeeeeers
Mark - re.mark@hotmail.co.uk
PS Great read!!

Les said...

I recently played Les Mis on a K2600X with the K2500 compatibility and farm disks loaded and I used a QA bank with the following sounds:

-Touch Orchestra (K2500)[Comparable to Touchy Orchestra on K2600]
-Dynamic Orchestra (K2500) [Comparable to DynOrch^WTellOrc on K2600]
-Horn&Flute w/Str (K2500&K2600)
-Huge Brass (K2500 Farm)
-Almost Muted (K2500 & K2600)
-Miles Unmuted (K2500)
-Synth Calliopes (K2600) [Synth Caliope on K2500]
-Acoustic Guitar (K2500)
-Dyno E Piano (K2500) [comparable to DynEPiano^EPnoPF on K2600]
-Clavinators 1^2 (K2600)

The rest of the orchestra consisted of Piano, Bass, Drum Set, Timpani, Vibraphone, Xylophone.

Overall it sounded great! The depth of the Kurzweil patches is wonderful. Hope this helps!

ste said...

I'm MD for Les Mis this year and we don't have access to DX7's. I've been told to use ordinary keybaords and to "just work it out".
I've listened to the recording, looked at the 2 keyboard parts to try and write a list of suitable sounds for my 2 keyboard payers. It's not that easy. I do have the keybaord books on hire, and I suppose all I can do is use the key in the front as a guide?

Any ideas or suggestions please?
Stephen

Chris said...

Stephen, I can assist you. Drop me a line at room317@hotmail.com.

Shane said...

Hi everyone,

I am doing the schools edition of Les Mis next year. I was MD for an adult production in 2002 and did battle with the DX7 programs (I managed to find someone with a working atari and now have all the patches in PC format) but we don't own any DX7s. Does anyone have the K2000 patches available to share?

Chris said...

I would suggest using FM8. Unless someone has a bootleg of them, they aren't currently available. Music Arts Technologies supplied them in the US and he's since closed his doors. With two computers and controllers you can create a patch chain for each part on FM8 and they're the original raw sounds rather than the cleaned up Kurzweil set.

cheersdarlin said...

please email me if any body has the patches. I am studying the Les Mis score and have been trying to find the patches, i have FM8. the mediafire file has been deleted. my email is lachlunnv@hotmail.com.

p.s. the score (for people like me who dont know what the numbers in hexagonal shapes, i.e. 205, 1, 5 - listed next to what seem like a listing system (i.e. U20.V15) mean) is no help for my research. as i am only studying the score, i dont have the money to get MTI to share.

Chris said...

U and L refer to "Upper" and "Lower", followed by the program number. Some are still left over in the Key 2 part of the full score.

V refers to a volume marking on the particular model of volume meter they were using.

I have the files, room317@hotmail.com

Jeff said...

If you're looking for easy access to the Les Mis keyboard sounds and programming, you should be aware of RMS Keyboards.

I know from a previous blog post that Alex is not particularly enamored of this work. He's clearly done a lot of research here and I respect his opinion. However, it's worth noting the following:

1. We (RMS, the creators of the program) worked directly with Cameron Mackintosh's office. The sounds have changed a lot over the last 30 years. You will not get anything that more closely reflects the currently used West End keyboard programming without working directly with Cameron's production team. (By the way, the Les Mis orchestration is about to change again, rendering all past keyboard work obsolete. We will be updating our treatment as soon as we get the new books.)

2. Sounds can be subjective, and it's not surprising especially among people with large synth and sample library collections to hear the refrain "I can do that better." One of the big benefits of RMS Keyboards is that you can easily swap in your own sounds. That way, you can take advantage of vast personal libraries while still making use of sounds that you might not have and - more importantly - all the complicated mapping, layering, splits, triggers etc. that make up the full show programming.

Chris said...

I've tried the RMS programs (first 5 songs). The programs seem identical to what I've used on the Kurzweil set. There are some errors in the patch chain but the sounds are great. The signature sounds are sampled, but the string, brass, and guitar sounds are new. They (and the Kurzweil set) lack the grit and character of the original. This all is irrelevant though, if MTI will be switching to the new (read: emasculated) 25th anniversary orchestrations and RMS switches to the new sounds. Save your old copies and rely on FM8!

Martin Hughes (Moderato Maestoso) said...

Interesting reading - especially as the author of the site you referenced Alex! ;) I'd completely forgotten about that site actually! Ah... younger days.

If anyone is interested, I will shortly be working up a full breakdown of keys programming for the Les Mis School Edition on my new site at http://www.moderatomaestoso.com

For reference, the Kurzweil patches were/are programmed by Stuart Andrews and are NOT publically available (as far as I'm aware) unless you license the show from Camack/MTI. Many were sampled from the original DX patches, but many have also changed.

If you're not into keys programming, then as Jeff said, the best option is RMS Keyboards. They will get you close to the sound, without a lot of stress. However, there are several glaring errors in the keyboard books (in terms of patch changes) as compared to either the original show, or Stuart's Kurzweil based patches - probably something to do with the cuts that were implemented for the school edition. I don't know if RMS Keys lets you reorder or cut patches or not.

In RMS's defence as regards the sound, sampling DX (or analog) sounds is always going to be tricky. I worked up a decent sample set of U10/U12/L12/U19 (the 'chain gang' based patches) in Kontakt, complete with scripting and multiple velocity release samples, and it comes in at about 4GB uncompressed... And I do this kind of thing for a living.

All best,

Martin Hughes

Jeff said...

While I would never claim that we are immune to error, I don't think it's correct to say that there are "glaring errors" in our treatment. What everyone should realize is that there have been *a lot* of versions of this score. We personally have worked with about 10 different complete sets of books over the years. Our treatment is an accurate reflection of what is currently sent out by MTI to North American licensees.

That said, it is indeed possible to make cuts, additions and reorder within our program.

Martin Hughes (Moderato Maestoso) said...

I wasn't suggesting in any way that the errors are in your treatment or the RMS Keyboards program Jeff! :) Sorry if was read that way.

The errors are in the School Edition keyboard *books* (as compared to the full MTI licensed books and the London Keys books at the time of the Palace Theatre closing, circa 2004, which thankfully still had the old DX markings in). I can only assume they are because of the cuts to the score for the school edition (and before that, the major cuts in 2001), and that the patch markings/changes weren't looked over properly when the scores were being proofread.

Martin Hughes (Moderato Maestoso) said...
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Martin Hughes (Moderato Maestoso) said...

Well, every day's a school day. I've been under the impression for years that the Les Mis signature sound (I call it 'Chain Gang Piano' for want of a better term) - ie patches U10, U12, L12, and U19 - are actually just a (slightly) modified preset.

There are *hundreds* of public domain DX7 sysex libraries out there on the web. Look for a file called 'dxoc17.syx'. Patch 12 is called "AccPno 4", and sounds remarkably similar. It's been brightened somewhat, but there's the basis.

Take a look at patches 21, 23, and 32 in the same bank too.

Martin

Chris said...

I think you're right. The original DX-7 patch names for all of them was " PNO 4", but I had to re-title them when I switched from FM7 to FM8 because it didn't recognize more than one patch with the same name.

It's also interesting that in that original patch set, there are some sounds that don't appear to have been used in the final version (ie: leadharp).

There are some errors in the books sent out by MTI in the US in regards to some patch changes (being in the wrong place, etc.) I have a copy of the original NY key 1 part but I'd love to get one of the key 2 book as well. It's a great resource.

Martin Hughes (Moderato Maestoso) said...

The problem with FM8 is that the patches are saved as separate files (in KoreSound format). I don't know how much longer NI will let me keep FM7 activated, but as it's working beautifully on my (Windows 7) system, I see no reason to use FM8 for the moment.

I've posted a link to the public domain sysex bank on my blog (see above for link). Nearly finished with the first post for Les Mis School Edition, which I hope helps RMS Keyboard users as well as people wanting to roll their own systems. Some of the patch markings in the books are completely wrong...

I do hope that even if they roll out the new orchestration for the School Edition as well, they allow the original orchestration to be licensed.

Martin

Chris said...

I hope they allow the original orchestration of both the regular and school editions to be licensed. It would be a shame to have it effectively disappear from the face of the earth, since the "official" productions are all now switched over.

I noticed some discrepancies between the MTI books I used in '07-'08 and the RMS programming, but I'm sure it could be adjusted. However, my main problem with the Kurzweil and RMS programming is the "other" sounds that had been updated. I know FM strings can be kind of gross, but they work mixed in with the real ones and give it some "punch." I particularly miss them in "At the End of the Day" in Key 1, because they sound like a whole different instrument. I also miss the mellow sustain pad that was replaced by a more legit sounding Kurzweil string patch. I liked the original "hard edge guitar" patch (Plumet Attack), the "Heavy EP 8vb" (the EP Roar sound with added vibrato, so effective on "whirlpool of my sin"), and the Thunder/DX-Intro effects that were edited out at the 10th anniversary. However, the fact that the "signature" sounds (Chain Gang, Lower 16 Roar, DX Harp) had been retained made them much more preferable to the 10th Anniversary Roland programming for the concert and the Brett Sommer programs that closed the original Broadway production. (John Cameron called them "emasculated.")

I know the new version has a "chain gang piano" type sound at the beginning, but it sounds thinner and less phased than the old one. Is it a sample of the original? In any case, I prefer the old sounds in almost all cases.

Love Martin's new blog!

Martin Hughes (Moderato Maestoso) said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Martin Hughes (Moderato Maestoso) said...

Ok, the first Les Mis post is finally up: http://www.moderatomaestoso.com/2011/08/les-miserables-school-edition-keyboard-programming-part-1/

This is something of an aside to the main Music Programming series I am running, but I plan to tie it all in when I've covered keyboard mapping (in the next post) with a rundown of programming all 3 chairs of LMSE (including the mapped Keys 3 chair).

SauceyJack said...

I have the same question as cheersdarlin. I understand what the "U" "L" and "V" numbers mean. (i.e. U20, V15). But what do the numbers in the hexagons mean. To illustrate, on the conductor's score (I don't know which version - sorry - but it has 3 keyboards) there will sometimes be numbers in hexagons that don't have any other indicators. For example, above the treble clef for Keyboard 1 there may be a single number of 205 inside a hexagon. Other times, there will be 2 numbers inside SEPARATE hexagons ("30" "4") next to each other. Sometimes they are above the grand staff, other times between the treble and bass clefs. What do these numbers mean? Thanks for your help.

-Tim

Chris said...

I believe the numbers in the hexagons refer to the Kurzweil patch number. In the Kurzweil set, I recall the first keyboard book starting on 1 and the second keyboard starting on 200 (of the same file). The third keyboard also started on 1, but it was a separate file. The other number, when there are two, would be a volume marking that corresponds to whatever meter they were using at the time.

Roger Foxcroft said...

Guys - some great reading here. I am Keys1 for Les Mis SE in July, and am trying to come up with the best combo of the signature sounds everyone loves, and more realistic sounds in some places. We don't have a string section, so will be using realistic (ish) string sounds in there somewhere. The Chain Gang piano, as well as the DX Harp will definitely feature.

My current setup is MainStage and FM8 on a MacBookPro, and I don't mind a bit of programming, but I can't see any indication of what MTIs RMS software actually costs. It looks good in theory, as we can drive all three keys off it, but is it £100 or £1000! Also, is it a compromise? The FM8 sounds are wonderful.

Any tips I can get will be appreciated.

P.S. Martin - loving your Blog! Thanks.

Chris said...

I honestly don't know what RMS Keyboards costs. It's not necessarily a compromise, although I have found some errors in registers comparing the first five songs to the keyboard parts. Most of the signature sounds are mostly the same, and the DX Harp and Chain Gang varieties are present, but several other things have been changed. I'd ask them for a quote. Even if you use FM8 for the first two books, their programming for Key III would be valuable (although I did notice an error right at the top of the show), because it is hard to program convincingly. If you use Key III with good programs, you don't have to worry about the DX7 strings sounding fake, because it'll sound like legit/synth hybrid in the mix as it originally did. Several of the tours had no strings because they Key III book (not used on Broadway) was so full.

Good luck!

Jeff said...

I respect the passion and obvious research that people like Chris have demonstrated here. But casual readers of this thread should be wary of any authoritative claims. Again, there have been *many* versions of the books. What Chis calls "errors" may simply be changes from the version he worked with. Our goal is to be true to the officially authorized version and consistent with the books that are shipped.

Roger Foxcroft said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Roger Foxcroft said...

In case anyone's interested I did get a quote for RMS, and it comes in at about £200 ($350) for a two-week run, which is pretty reasonable, but I'm still going to have a go myself. It looks like we'll actually supplement the pit with more students in July, so we'll have real strings, and I will probably run key1 and key2 through main stage and work the patches out myself.

Mainstage itself is ok on sounds, but may well compliment with my JV. I read somewhere (here perhaps) that some of the sounds were moved to JV after the DX7-II - is there any more information on that?

Martin Hughes (Moderato Maestoso) said...

Yes - the keyboards were reprogrammed off the DX7s to (I think...) SY77s or SY99s, and then to the JV modules. These sounds can be heard on the 10th Anniversary Concert and German cast recordings. I believe it was after that that they went over to Kurzweils.

Josh said...

Can anybody help me?
I would really love to get copies of the following books:
Keyboard 1
Keyboard 2
Keyboard 3
Guitar
Bass
Drums

MTI sent me the rental package for our upcoming auditions...it's the NEW orchestration! :-(

Does anyone here have PDFs of the ORIGINAL parts?
We are using K2600s.

Thanks!
Josh

Chris said...

Josh: I know they are floating around. I have them, but not with me (I'm on tour). Did you check with MTI to see if the originals are available? Perhaps the new orchestration is the default, but they can provide the old version on request?

Josh said...

Thanks Chris, I'm going to have my producer call and make the request to MTI. Meanwhile, if anyone here has the original parts, drop me an email!

Cheers,
Josh
jdsmith210@yahoo.com

Chris said...

Josh,

Were you able to get the older orchestrations from MTI? I'm curious because a few people have asked me if it was available and I haven't been able to say for sure.

Josh said...

My producer says she sent an email to MTI asking and has not heard back yet. I will keep you posted!

Jeff said...

My theater company will be performing Les Miz this summer. We will likely be using at least one Motif keyboard, possibly two. (Classic and XF). Any suggestions on patch selection?

Josh said...

From MTI:


Thank you for your email. The score you’ve received is for the only orchestration we have available for the show. this is the version that the authors have approved for production.

Chris said...

Aww that's a real bummer. Well, that'll cause people to hunt down copies of the original orchestration and hope that it flies under the radar, sort of like with A CHORUS LINE. It's a shame. To Jeff, since you'll probably be using the new books, I can't offer any assistance, but the sounds are more orchestral and less characteristic, so I'm sure you'll be able to recreate them on the Motif.

Oneota said...

If anyone happens to find the original books floating around, and felt like leaving helpful "hints" as to where one might locate them, the rest of the internet would surely appreciate it! ;-)

Josh said...

Chris...drop me an email, please!

jdsmith210@yahoo.com